Author Archives: lynnjkelly

About lynnjkelly

Australian/American. Practicing Buddhist.

Mind states

The four frameworks for cultivating mindfulness, according to the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta (MN10), are: Body Feeling (pleasant, unpleasant, neither) Mind states Phenomena (hindrances, awakening factors, etc.) We’re up to the third of these, training ourselves to be aware of what is … Continue reading

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Mindfulness of feeling

When feeling a pleasant feeling, one knows: “I feel a pleasant feeling”; when feeling a painful feeling, one knows: “I feel a painful feeling”; when feeling a neutral feeling, one knows: “I feel a neutral feeling”. (From the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta, … Continue reading

Posted in Anger, Causes and results, Friendships, Imperfections, Mindfulness, Patience, Speech | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Freedom from (fear of) death

In order to dwell independently and not cling to anything, it is helpful to identify our dependencies and what we cling to. Whenever it stings, wherever there is agitation, it is right there that dependencies and clinging show up. It … Continue reading

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Desire – sensual or the other kind?

In the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta there are a few “mindfulness of the body” exercises that are recommended specifically to help us address our sexual/sensual compulsion. The first of these is contemplation of our body parts; we imagine dividing ourselves into our component … Continue reading

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“Bare awareness” mindfulness

Continuing from the last post, the four activities that form the “refrain” in the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta are: Internal and external contemplation of body, feeling, mind, and mind-objects (the four foundations or frameworks) Arising and passing away of experience in each … Continue reading

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Four ways to be mindful

Anālayo Bhikkhu illuminates the Buddha’s instructions for us by describing the “refrain” in the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta, that is, a four-part formula that is applied to each of the four bases or frameworks for cultivating mindfulness (body, feeling, mind, mind-objects). In … Continue reading

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Mindfulness defined

Bhikkhus, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the surmounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of pain and grief, for the attainment of the true way, for the realisation of Nibbana — namely, the … Continue reading

Posted in Causes and results, Dukkha, General, Mindfulness, Patience | Tagged , , | 1 Comment