Not my anger

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Rājagaha in the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrel Sanctuary. The brahmin Akkosaka Bhāradvāja, Bhāradvāja the Abusive, heard: “It is said that another brahmin of the Bhāradvāja clan has gone forth from the household life into homelessness under the ascetic Gotama.” Angry and displeased, he approached the Blessed One and abused and reviled him with rude, harsh words.

When he had finished speaking, the Blessed One said to him: “What do you think, brahmin? Do your friends and colleagues, kinsmen and relatives, as well as guests come to visit you?” – “They do, Master Gotama.” – “Do you then offer them some food or a meal or a snack?” – “I do, Master Gotama.” – “But if they do not accept it from you, then to whom does the food belong?” – “If they do not accept it from me, then the food still belongs to us.”

“So too, brahmin, I do not abuse anyone, do not scold anyone, do not rail against anyone. I refuse to accept from you the abuse and scolding and tirade you let loose at me. It still belongs to you, brahmin! It still belongs to you, brahmin!

“Brahmin, one who abuses his own abuser, who scolds the one who scolds him, who rails against the one who rails at him – he is said to partake of the meal, to enter upon an exchange. But I do not partake of your meal; I do not enter upon an exchange. It still belongs to you, brahmin! It still belongs to you, brahmin!” (SN 7:2, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi)

This is a well-known sutta, probably because it is so often relevant. The question is, can we remember this story when we feel like engaging angrily with an angry person? It can be a mighty challenge.

If we stand back and observe from a distance, an angry person looks deranged. They are in the grip of an emotion that is overpowering their reason and their judgment; they can’t see the consequences of their actions. A wise person will not engage directly with someone in that state.

What quality in us makes it so difficult to allow another person to spew their anger and not have our own anger aroused? We can feel as if we’re being attacked, as if a war has already begun and we must stand and fight. Some of us are so sensitive that even an imagined slight, someone failing to say “Good morning”, can set us off. Others of us can handle anger directed at ourselves but explode if we think someone we care about is being treated unfairly.

What can we do? Best would be to understand that others’ anger belongs to them and that we can choose whether to respond in kind or to take another path of action. For this to be so, we would need to know what our triggers are and try to correct for them when necessary. Can we raise our self-awareness to this level when under duress?

2 Comments

Filed under Anger, Harmlessness, Mindfulness, Patience, Perfections, Speech

2 responses to “Not my anger

  1. Hello Frank,
    More reading may not be the most helpful thing here, though I’ll be writing more about not taking things personally in coming weeks.

    As with most of the Buddha’s teachings, we are being asked to inquire inwardly. Let me pose a couple of questions for your reflection:
    – When you feel you’ve been treated disrespectfully, does the person in question treat others the same, or do you feel singled out?
    – Do you have the same expectations for respectful treatment from everyone? Work colleagues? Family members? Strangers?

    It occurs to me that expecting everyone to treat us with respect is analogous to expecting all drivers to be courteous. It’s a good way to drive ourselves mad. Reality is simply not structured that way. Samsara is real, and we are in it together.

    I hope this helps a bit.

    Metta,
    Lynn

  2. This is a very relevant topic for me, as I find I take things rather to heart when someone treats me disrespectfully. Can you point to further reading on this topic of the angry person ‘owning’ the anger?

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